Wednesday 01 Oct 2014

Halloween Wedding

September 15th, 2014 by veronica

Halloween is well known for the candy and the decorations for children now days. Some of the things that many people do all around the word is  trick-or-treating, costume parties, decorating, carving pumpkins, bonfires, apple bobbing, visiting haunted house attractions, playing pranks, telling scary stories, and watching horror films. I bet you didn’t know that this day is also known for All Saint’s Eve.  In many countries as a religious note they light candles on the graves of the dead. The amazing thing is that however people wish to celebrate this day they decorate with flowers in many different ways as well.

Flowers are used even in Halloween weddings. Don’t think that because the wedding is on Halloween you have to have a creepy and scary wedding. Many people say that it is bad luck if you get married on Halloween, well that is the first mistake you would make believe that it is bad luck, because trust me it is not. Let’s begin with your bridesmaids; they can carry an amazing bouquet of orange Ranunculus, with some type of green that you really like.

The next one of your wedding party I would say is the flower girl. You can place beautiful orange Freesia in her hair and make a fantastic decoration. She can dress like a fairy or a princess with wings and it can be the color light orange or even black with orange belt. The petals that this little princess will carry can be the orange rose petals or the orange salmon rose petals. You may wonder what is the difference between these two and it is that one is a dark orange and one is a very light orange.

Now we will see what the amazing bride can use in orange. My suggestion is that she has White Cattleya Orchids, Mango & Sunrise Mini Callas, and Yellow Carnations & Greens all into one bridal bouquet. If she wants something that shows more the orange she can also get the Mango & Sunrise Mini Callas, Kangaroo paws, Israeli Ruscus and Aspidistra Leaves bridal bouquet. I would say it is amazing actually that the bridesmaid carry orange and the bride carried something a darker color. In this case she can use the Chocolate Nosegay Mini Calla Bridal Bouquet or the Eggplant Dark Purple Nosegay Mini Calla Bridal Bouquet. These bouquets com already prepared so the bride doesn’t have to worry about preparing them herself. If she wishes she can add some transparent beads to hang from bouquets.

Obviously my friends we don’t want to leave the mother of the bride of the mother in law left behind. To add a little different touch to this you can actually have corsages for them. The Purple Mini Calla, Yellow Rose & Green Leaves made into a hand corsage is perfect for these beautiful ladies. You would think they don’t come with anything at all but these corsages include floral tape, satin ribbon, bow or pin. If they prefer to wear a pinned corsage they could use the Dark Purple Mini Calla & Greens that also include floral tape, satin ribbon, bow or pin.

See flowers can be used for a wedding decoration in many ways. You just have to use your imaginations and come to Whole Blossoms where we are happy to assist you with you Halloween Wedding. If you wish to use orange, white, yellow, or dark colors for you wedding we are happy to offer you a large variety of flowers for your event. This is one of the most important events in your life, and we want to make sure that you enjoy every moment of at and not have to worry about the flowers, let us do that for you.

What do You Know about Dahlias?

September 15th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are five things to remember about dahlias:

  1. Dahlias may have single or multiple rows of petals. The blossoms range from small, ball types to large rays resembling daisies or peonies. Dahlias are available in dwarf sizes reaching only about a foot in height to taller varieties sometimes standing almost 6 feet, with blossoms about 16 inches across.
  2. Buy fresh dahlias when they are three-fourths to fully open, with petals showing good color and no wilting outer petals.
  3. Dahlias start to wilt from the outer petals toward the center. Check the backs of the flowers for freshness when purchasing. Dahlias wilt easily, so pulling off any foliage and buds helps the flower last longer.
  4. Dahlias have attractive dark-green foliage and interesting offshoots of smaller blossoms and buds. However, they last longer if foliage and buds are removed.
  5. When dahlia flowers begin to wilt from the back, gently remove the outer wilted or discolored petals for a fresh-looking, smaller flower to use in arrangements.

Here are some facts about dahlias:

Names – Dahlia

Varieties – There are about 28 species of dahlias and hundreds of varieties. These varieties are separated into 12 divisions, based on blossom type and shape.

Colors – All shades and colors available, except no true blue. Many dahlias are striped or variegated. Some of the colors and combinations appear fluorescent, almost unreal.

Scent – None

Freshness – Purchase of cut when the flowers are three-fourths to fully open. The outer petals should not be discolored or wilted.

Vase Life – Approximately 5 days, sometimes longer

Availability – Summer to early fall

Cost – Inexpensive

Arranging Tip – Once dahlias start to wilt from the back, gently pull these petals off for a fresh-looking smaller flower.

Growing Tip – Dahlias are prolific bloomers, producing many flowers throughout their season. Unlike most tuberous and bulb flowers which give only a one-time show and rest until the next year, dahlias continue to bloom later than most flowers and offer a splash of color in the garden into fall. But they are very frost sensitive, so dig up the tubers just before the first frost and store until the next year for replanting.

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices.

What Aspects Make A Gorgeous Wedding Bouquet?

September 15th, 2014 by AyanB

In order to create the most lovely wedding bouquet for your special day, make sure you include (or at least think about) the following pieces of a wedding bouquet.

elements of a wedding bouquet What Aspects Make A Gorgeous Wedding Bouquet?

What do You Know about Bells of Ireland?

September 14th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Bells of Ireland 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are three things to know about Bells of Ireland:

  1. Bells of Ireland are tall, apple-green spike flowers consisting of several small white blossoms surrounded by green shell-type petals. The spikes are generally about 24 inches in length. Fresh bells of Ireland have the shell petals open and the small white flowers exposed. The spikes are straight and firm to the touch.
  2. The tips of bells of Ireland begin to droop with age. The shell-type petals at the base of the spike appear to be closed and may be discolored. The spike is soft to the touch.
  3. Bells of Ireland are most appreciated for the predominantly bright-green foliage surrounding the small white flowers, rather than for the flowers themselves. They can be used as a foliage choice as well. The color accents other flowers and brightens the overall bouquet.

Some facts to know about Bells of Ireland:

Names – Bells of Ireland, Moluccella, and shellflower.

Colors – Very small white flowers surrounded by predominant bright-green shells.

Scent – Very faint musk fragrance

Freshness – The shells are open and the white flowers exposed. The stems are upright.

Vase Life – 7 to 10 days or longer.

Availability – spring and summer

Cost – Inexpensive.

Arranging Tip – The bright-green color of bells of Ireland is a great accent in flower combinations. Use them like a foliage choice. Cut the tips off about one-third of the way down and set aside. Fill the vase with a base of the cut stems. Fill in with other flowers. Add the tips of the bells of Ireland around the edges of the other flowers and the container. The color really brightens the bouquet.

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

What do You Know about Calla Lilies?

September 14th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Calla Lilies 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are four basic things to remember about calla lilies:

  1. Calla lilies are exquisite flowers with long trumpet-shaped blossoms and thick fibrous stems. A fresh calla is mostly open, but with the outer petal still reaching upward. The middle of the flower is clean, with no sign pollination. The flower shows good color with no bruising.
  2. Older callas have the outer petal curving downward, with the middle of the flower exposed. The middle shows signs of pollen. The flowers may also have bruising or discoloration, especially on the outer edges of the petal.
  3. Callas have thick, fibrous stems that act much like a sponge. The stems absorb and hold water. This is why callas have such a very long vase life. They are a very low-maintenance flower, but be sure to recut the stems every few days to allow fresh water to penetrate to the blossom. Calla stems sometimes turn to mush because the stems hold the water and the ends become clogged. They need a constant water flow to remain fresh.
  4. Flames colored calla lilies in a vase are elegant in their simplicity.

Here are some facts about calla lilies:

Names Calla lily, Arum Lily, Zantedeschia.

Varieties – The most common is the tall white variety, two to three feet in length.

Colors – White, shades of yellow, pink to deep rose, orange to Chinese red, salmon, burgundy, black. There is also a green variety called “green goddess.”

Scent – None

Freshness– The flowers are open, but the outer petal (or spathe) still turns upward. The middle is clean and shows no pollination. Watch for bruising.

Vase Life – 10 days or more. Callas are designed to hold water.

Availability – All year, but late winter to late spring is the peak season.

Cost – Expensive

Meaning – Calla lilies symbolize magnificent beauty

Note – The white calla has long been a symbol of purity, and is widely used in weddings as well as funerals.

Arranging Tip – The calla lily is the epitome of elegance. These flowers can add drama to any combination, but have just as strong a presence used alone.

Other – Check the water level frequently, since calla lilies are heavy drinkers.

Here are some popular varieties you may be interested in:

 

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

What do You Know about Bouvardia?

September 14th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Bouvardia 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are three things to understand about Bouvardia:

  1. Bouvardias are clusters of small tubular flowers with four equal petals atop slender woody stems. A fresh Bouvardia should be mostly in bud stage, with only one to two flowers open. The buds should show good color.
  2. Older Bouvardia has most of their flowers open; some may have started to bend or drop from the cluster. Bouvardias bruise very easily when handled.
  3. Bouvardias are prone to premature wilting because water has difficulty penetrating the dense woody stems to reach the branching flower clusters. To prolong vase life, recut the stems and place into deep, fresh water frequently. This will help keep a steady water flow to the flowers. Also, tear off any excess greenery and blossoms so that more water reaches the primary blossoms.

Here are some facts about Bouvardia:

Names – Bouvardia

Varieties – Bouvardia hybrids in single and double varieties.

Colors – Whites, pinks, peaches, red, and a new green shade.

Scent – Very faint to none

Freshness – The buds show color, and only a couple of blossoms are open. The flowers bruise very easily.

Vase Life – Approximately 5 days. Bouvardia is very water sensitive. There is a special floral food available at most florists for Bouvardia, which aids in water absorption.

Availability – All year, but summer and fall are the predominant seasons.

Cost – Moderately priced

Arranging Tip – Bouvardia is popular choice for a wedding bouquet flower, but remember that they do not hold up out of water.

Here are some popular varieties of Bouvardia:

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to assist you by offering the freshest cut of wholesale flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING on every order of our flowers at incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

What do You Know about Chrysanthemums?

September 13th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Chrysanthemums 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are five things to keep in mind with chrysanthemums:

  1. Chrysanthemums come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes. They are separated into 13 categories, depending on the blossoms type or shape of petals. Chrysanthemums can be single blossoms or sprays with several flowers. The blossoms range from daisy to cushion or button types. They can be single or have double layers of petals. The petals can curve inward, called incurve, or be reflexed, curving out.
  2. A popular type of chrysanthemum, especially in autumn to wear to football games, is the very large round blossom type with incurve petals. This variety has been nicknamed football mums.
  3. Chrysanthemums are a very long-lasting flower. It is best to purchase or cut them when the flowers are fully open. Cut too early in bud stage, they will not open. The daisy types will have the middle exposed. Other types, such as button or cushion blossoms, will be open, but the middle will appear to open further. Fresh chrysanthemums show good color and are firm to the touch.
  4. Older chrysanthemums have petals faded into color. The petals may become more separated with age, and the flower may feel almost soft to the touch. It may shed some of its petals when handled.
  5. The common daisy belongs to the chrysanthemum family.

Here are some facts about chrysanthemums:

Names – Chrysanthemum, Mum.

Varieties – About 1,000 different varieties.

Colors – Available in most shades but no true blue. Some are two-toned and multicolored.

Scent – A strong musk scent.

Freshness – Purchase or cut when the flowers are three-fourths to fully open. Flowers in bud will usually not open after being cut.

Vase Life – 10 days to two weeks or longer.

Availability – All year, but the prime season is summer.

Cost – Inexpensive

Meaning – The name chrysanthemum means “golden flower” in Greek. Individual colors have their own meanings: Red symbolizes love, white symbolizes truth, and yellow symbolizes slighted love. Snubbed in some countries as a funeral flower, the chrysanthemum is the national symbol of Japan, where it signifies long life and happiness.

Arranging Tip – Chrysanthemums are a very long-lasting cut flower and popular for arrangements. But they can shorten the vase life of other flowers and are best used alone.

Other – Chrysanthemums have thick, coarse stems which one would normally hammer or split. However, these flowers should be cut at a diagonal instead, owing to the large amounts of gas they give off. Change the water frequently to avoid an overabundance of harmful bacteria. A few pieces of horticultural charcoal in the water will help absorb some of the bacteria between water changes.

Here are some popular varieties you may be interested in:

Button Poms

CDN (Cushion, Daisy, Novelty) Pom

Cushion Poms

Daisy Poms

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

4 Ideas in Making Single-Stem Bouquets for Your Wedding

September 12th, 2014 by Paul Walls

A quick, simple, and inexpensive DIY project for you or your bridesmaids’ florals is to create single-stem flowers to use in place of bouquets, or fashioning a simple ribbon wrap to cluster informal bunches of flowers for a more casual wedding.

Single-stem and bunch bouquets, by virtue of being easy to create, are also great budget-friendly choices, as there is very little labor involved. The ultra detailed Biedermeier bouquet, which can take hours and hundreds of tiny flowers to affix in painstaking concentric circles, using both glue and pins. With this style of bouquet, you have just three easy steps.

Your bouquet choice always coordinates with the formality of your wedding and the design of your dress, so these styles offer the simplest class of effort for both formal and informal weddings. For instance, a single-stemmed calla lily works for a formal wedding, while a single-stemmed Gerber daisy suits an informal wedding. Your choice of ribbon must also work with the style and formality of your day, so look at lovely satin ribbon, some containing tiny pearl edges, for your more formal event, lace ribbon for your romantic Victorian garden wedding, or bright satin ribbon to match the color of daisy for your casual backyard wedding. In the informal realm, brides are choosing striped ribbon, plaids, and even ribbons with funky circles or color blocks to add a punch of creativity to their self-made designs.

The type of ribbon you use to create your single-stem or bunch bows and ties can also be used as coordinating décor for other parts of your wedding day, such as fabric placeholder in your guest book or the ribbon you use in your DIY favors, and even the ribbon you use in your flower girls’ hair.

  1. Using Single-Stem Roses
  • Choose a rose with a head that’s about to bloom for best appearance on your wedding day.
  • Choose a rose with a straight stem, strip it of leaves and thorns, and cut the stem to a length of 12 to 14 inches.
  • Ribbons wrap either the entire stem or simply tie a bow. Store your ribbon-bow-only single-stem flowers in a vase of water until it’s time to walk down the aisle.
  1. Using Single-Stem Callas
  • Gather the stems, perhaps moving the green leaves to the top of the collection, nearest the blooms.
  • Wrap the stem and leaves in place with floral tape all the way down the stem.
  • Wrap the entire stem with satin ribbon to give the flower enough sturdiness, or skip the tape and ribbon wrap and just tie a satin bow around the top third of the stem for decoration
  1. Using Single-Stem Daisies
  • Carefully remove the plastic brace set just below the flower’s head for support during shipping just before it’s time to walk down the aisle, but leave it on as you wrap the stem.
  • Daisy stems should be wrapped tightly with floral tape to give it extra strength, then covered with a ribbon wrap and tied with a ribbon bow.
  • If you cut the stems to a six-to eight-inch length, you can wrap them with lace instead of ribbon.
  1. Using Bunches
  • Gather your chosen wild-flowers, tulips, peonies, daisies, or other flowers and begin assembling your chosen arrangement of blooms.
  • Begin with larger flowers in the center; then build in circles around the outside.
  • Wrap the entire collection of stems with floral tape, cut across the bottom for a uniform cut level, and then wrap the entire stem collection with ribbon or lace in spiral fashion, going once down and then up to tie in a bow at the top.

Hopefully these are some helpful ideas to add to your wedding planning. At Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers, we would love to assist you and provide you with the freshest wholesale flowers available. We have FREE SHIPPING on every order and have very low prices. Come visit us at www.wholeblossoms.com.

What do You Know about Allium?

September 12th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Allium 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are four basic things to remember about allium:

  1. Alliums are clusters of small, star-shaped blossoms. The blossoms can be compact, forming a round, globelike cluster such as seen in the popular giganteum variety. This variety can reach four to six feet in height. Alliums can also be small, loose sprays of blossoms.
  2. A fresh allium should have one-third to one-half its blossoms open.
  3. Older allium flowers have most of their blossoms open, with some dried out. The onion odor may be more noticeable.
  4. The small white spray known as Allium neopolitanum is the only variety with a sweet, pleasant scent. This variety makes an excellent cut flower for arrangements.

Here are some additional facts about allium:

Names Allium, ornamental onion flower

Varieties – There are over 400 varieties of alliums. Alliums are composed of many star-shaped blossoms, which may be compact to form a round cluster, or loose sprays of blossoms.

Colors – Most alliums come in shades of purple, but some varieties are available in white, pink, or yellow.

Scent – Slight onion scent, becoming noticeable when the flowers are bruised, damaged, or aging.

Freshness – Alliums should have one-third to one-half of their blossoms open.

Vase Life – 10 days up to 3 weeks. Change the water frequently to prevent odor from developing.

Availability – Late spring through summer.

Cost – The giganteum variety—expensive. Other varieties—inexpensive to moderately priced.

Meaning – European folklore ascribed magical properties to the ornamental onion. The plant was used for good luck and protection against demons.

Arranging Tip – Be careful not to bruise the flowers when arranging, as this will release the onion odor.

Growing Tip – Alliums are very easy to grow, multiplying rapidly. They do well in poor or dry soil, and in full sun or shade. The flowers can last up to a month in the garden. Plant the tall, big-blossomed varieties in an area protected from wind, since the stems break easily.

Here are some specific varieties you may be interested in:

If you are looking for more information, or are looking for flowers for your next wedding and planned event, the people of Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to help you. We have a large variety of flowers at wholesale prices, plus so much more. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com

 

What do You Know about Amaryllis?

September 12th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Amaryllis 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are five things to keep in mind with amaryllis:

  1. Amaryllis or Hippeastrum are tall flowers having thick green stems with two to five large, trumpet-shaped blossoms at the top. Mini amaryllis are basically the same flower, but much shorter and with smaller blossoms.
  2. Amaryllis Belladonna has pink blossoms and deep brown stems. This variety is fragrant.
  3. A fresh amaryllis has most of its blossoms closed or just one beginning to open. The buds show great color and size, and the stem feels strong and sturdy. It is normal for the bottom of the stem to curl. This is not an indication of freshness.
  4. Older amaryllis has most of their flowers open, with the tips beginning to dry out or becoming discolored. The stems feel weak, and older ones may start to crack or break.
  5. Mostly used in tall bouquets, amaryllis cut down with a few other flowers make a full, impressive, long-lasting arrangement that does not require a lot of flowers.

Here are some facts about amaryllis:

Names – Amaryllis or Hippeastrum, Amaryllis Belladonna or Belladonna Lily,

Varieties – Hippeastrums are available in single and double varieties as well.

Colors – White, pale yellow or green; shades of pink; salmon, red, and burgundy. Some are striped or variegated.

Scent – None, except for the Belladonna variety, which has a mild, sweet fragrance.

Freshness – Most of the blossoms are closed, but show good color and size. Watch for bruises on the tips of the blooms.

Vase Life – Approximately 7 to 10 days or longer

Availability – Amaryllis Hippeastrum is available December through April for cut flowers. The bulbs are available in the fall. The Belladonna variety is available in late August to early October.

Cost – Winter—expensive. Spring—moderately expensive.

 

Meaning – This dramatic flower symbolizes pride.

Arranging Tip – Amaryllis stand about 24 inches or more. They make an impressive statement alone or mixed in tall arrangements, but can be just as showy cut down for shorter bouquets.

Growing Tip – To force amaryllis bulbs, pick a container only slightly larger than the bulb. Amaryllis bulbs like to be crowded, because they rot easily and a smaller space cuts down excess moisture. Plant the bulb with one-third of its surface exposed. Water once and place in medium to strong light. Do not water again until there is a sign of growth. Then water once a week. When the bulb is finished flowering, continue watering until the stalk and leaves die back, thus nourishing the bulb for the next flowering. Stop watering, place in a cool, dark spot for approximately six months, then start the process again. The older the bulb, the more flower stalks the bulb will produce.

Other – Amaryllis in bud stage opens slowly and turns toward the light. Make sure this flower is in an evenly lit place, or you may need to turn the vase or pot to ensure a well-developed blossom.

Specific varieties of amaryllis you may be interested in:

If you are planning a wedding or social event, you may consider amaryllis. You may also want to check out our wide variety of flowers at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers. Just go to our website at www.wholeblossoms.com and allow a professional to assist you with all of your wholesale flower needs.