The Beauty Of Hydrangeas

June 19th, 2015 by Paul Walls

Green Hydrangea 200x300 The Beauty Of Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas have always been a popular flower variety. I can remember seeing my grandfather planting my grandmother’s favorite white hydrangeas; they would sit out by their garden in lawn chairs, holding hands and looking at their splendid floral displays. Unfortunately they are not really considered anymore because of the variety of other flowers available today. Whenever I look at hydrangeas I can think of many different things.

One thing to think of is that they are far more affordable than some of the other varieties people are planting or using for their events or displays. Newer varieties will even grow in cooler climates and have much deeper, and richer colors. Whole Blossoms has several varieties in which I will list for you below. Certain hydrangeas can even change their color depending on the soil they are planted in. We see this a lot with certain varieties that come from California and Colombia. Farms experiment with creating new colors by working with the acid and alkaline conditions of the soil, also by adding a layer of lime stone or chalk, red hydrangeas are dramatically enhanced.

Planting and caring for hydrangeas is pretty easy. They always seem to thrive when planted in sunny areas, moist soil, and plenty of room to grow without having to be pruned as often. Too much shade will cause a great deal of problems, especially when planting them under a tree. Trees love the moist soil that hydrangeas supply and their roots will cut off their ability to drink water.

They are also quite disease-resistant, but occasionally can be infected. Mildew sometimes forms in heavy shade and humid conditions. Leaf spots, root rot, and even rust can occur if they are planted in the wrong conditions.

Hydrangeas make wonderful cut flowers and are perfect for bouquets, but one thing to keep in mind is the variations of color than can occur because of the climate and soil conditions as previously mentioned.

If you have an event and are planning on using hydrangeas, we have some helpful tips for you to remember. Occasionally we will have a customer worry that their hydrangeas appear wilted. First of all, if they do look wilted it’s because they love to drink water and miss it during their transport. However, they are perfectly normal.

Wilted Hydrangeas 300x225 The Beauty Of Hydrangeas

Hydrangeas that appear wilted, but this is normal

The stems of hydrangeas have a liquid that seals the bottom so the heads do not receive water, even though people cut them they still don’t receive water. So what you can do is to get a peeler, like a potato peeler and peel the bottom of the stem all the way around, much like you would peel a cucumber. Then you take a knife a make several cuts all over and around the peeled part of the stem. When you do this the heads will get real big because they will be able to get more water. To get your hydrangeas at the maximum size on their heads, once you have peeled the stems, then you fill a tub with filtered water at room temperature. Once you have the tub filled then you fully submerge the stem and head, they cannot just be floated, but fully submerged for 4 to 6 hours and it is miraculous! They come back to full life. These flowers are extremely sensitive to water. That is why hydrangeas coming from a very long distance appear wilted or dying, they simply need hydration, but the result is a beautiful flower for arrangements. The heads are so full, sometimes you can make a bouquet with one stem.

Again, remember if your hydrangeas are a true blue, depending on the pH levels in the rains coming from the farms, your hydrangeas may have a tinge of purple and farms really don’t have a way of predicting this kind of outcome. At Whole Blossoms, we hope this article has been helpful and will be more than happy to assist you with completing an order for hydrangeas or any floral need you may have.

Here are the hydrangea varieties we currently have available:

Assorted

White

Silver/White

Natural Blue

Green Antique

Popcorn

Elite Shocking Blue

Elite Lavender Blue

Elite Purple

Elite Lavender

Tinted Assorted

Tinted Black

Tinted Purple

Tinted Berenjena Dark Purple

Tinted Lavender

Tinted Antique Purple

Tinted Green

Tinted Jumbo Lavender

Super Select White

Super Select Blue

Jumbo White

Jumbo Light Blue

Jumbo Blue

Jumbo Lime Green

Dutch Blue

Dutch Lavender

 

 

 

What Do You Know About Carnations?

January 7th, 2015 by Paul Walls

Carnations 101

CN Title What Do You Know About Carnations?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are five things to know about Carnations:

CN 1 What Do You Know About Carnations?

  1. Carnations are large single or miniature multistemmed flowers with compact blossoms made up of many frilled petals. They are sometimes referred to as “pinks,” because the edges of the petals appear to be cut with pinking shears.
  2. A fresh carnation should be about half open, and the miniature spray variety should have a few flowers half to fully open, with the others in the bud.
  3. Older carnations will be fully open, with some of the dense petals curving outward. The edges of the petals may have started to discolor and dry out.
  4. One specific variety of dianthus is called sweet wiilliam. It is available in the spring and early summer in shades of red, pink, and white. Sweet William is a long lasting cut flower as well as a popular garden flower.
  5. Large pink carnations cut down and massed together almost resemble garden roses and peonies.

Here is some additional information about Carnations:

CN 2 What Do You Know About Carnations?CN 4 What Do You Know About Carnations?

Names: Carnation, Dianthus

Varieties: There are over 300 species of dianthus, and hundreds of varieties. The common florist carnations or English carnation is available in large single blooms and in a miniature or spray variety with five to six flowers per stem.

Colors: Available in an enormous array of shades and colors; some varieties are bicolored or variegated. The most common colors are red, pink, white, and burgundy. Carnations are popular to dye.

Scent: Some have a fresh clove scent.

Freshness: The flowers are about half open. The spray variety has a few flowers half to fully open. The spray variety has a few flowers half to fully open, with the rest in bud.

Vase Life: 10 days to 2 weeks, sometimes longer. Although this is a long-lasting flower, be careful when handling carnations, as their heads can pop off easily.

Availability: All year

Cost: Inexpensive

Meaning: A pink carnation is the symbol of a mother’s love and an emblem of Mother’s Day. Other colors have their own meanings: Yellow is for disdain, purple is for antipathy, striped for refusal. White is for pure and ardent love, while red means “alas my poor heart.”

Arranging Tip: Carnations are inexpensive, very long-lasting flowers, so one would expect them to be a favorite. However, they are shunned by many as cheap and undesirable. Carnations can be manipulated to take on an elegant look by massing them together in a tight bunch.

Here are some varieties of carnations we have available:

CN Wedding 1 What Do You Know About Carnations?CN Wedding What Do You Know About Carnations?

Standard Carnations

-          Assorted

-          White

-          Peach

-          Cream

-          White/Red

-          Light Pink

-          Pink

-          Hot Pink

-          Dark Pink/Purple

-          Lavender

-          Purple

-          Burgundy

-          Red

-          Yellow

-          Yellow/Red

-          Green

-          Orange

-          Red/White Cheerio

-          Blue (Tinted)

We also have:

-          Fancy Carnations

-          Select Carnations

-          Mini Carnations

-          Carnation Heads

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

 

 

What do You Know about Campanula?

January 2nd, 2015 by Paul Walls

Campanula 101

Cam Title What do You Know about Campanula?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are four things to know about Campanula:

Cam 1 What do You Know about Campanula?Cam 2 What do You Know about Campanula?

  1. The Campanula species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Common Pug, Doth Moth, Ingrailed Clay, Limespeck Pug and Mouse Moth.
  2. The leaves are alternate and often vary in shape on a single plant, with larger, broader leaves at the base of the stem and smaller, narrower leaves higher up; the leaf margin may be either entire or serrated (sometimes both on the same plant).
  3. Many species contain white latex in the leaves and stems.
  4. Some species have a small additional leaf-like growth termed an “Appendage” between each sepal, and the presence or absence, relative size, and attitude of the appendage is often used to distinguish between closely related species.

Here are some additional facts about Campanula you might be interested in:

Cam 3 What do You Know about Campanula?Cam 4 What do You Know about Campanula?

Names:  Campanula, Bell Flower, Chimney Bells, and Canterbury Bells

Varieties: Campanula

Colors:  White, Purple, and Lavender

Scent:  The Campanula will honor your senses of sight and smell with its beauty and aroma.

Freshness: Purchase when half of the buds are open and half still closed.

Vase Life: 5 to 7 days.

Availability: Year Round

Costs:  Affordable

Meaning: The name is from the Latin word campana (bell) referring to the bell shaped flowers.

Arranging Tip:  Remove all foliage that will be below the water line. Cut under water with a sharp knife.  Hydrate in a solution of warm water and commercial floral preservative / floral food for two hours before storage or usage.

Here are some varieties we have available:

Cam Wedding 1 What do You Know about Campanula?Cam Wedding What do You Know about Campanula?

-          Purple

-          Lavender

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

What do You Know about Baby’s Breath?

December 28th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Baby’s Breath 101

BB Title What do You Know about Baby’s Breath?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are four things to know about Baby’s Breath:

 

  1. Baby’s breath is a species of Gypsophilia that originated in the Mediterranean and Eastern Europe. Many tiny flowers are produced on branched stems giving a delicate, lacy, snowflake appearance.
  2. Baby’s breath is available in either pink or white varieties, which you can also get tinted. Re-cutting stems will encourage full blooming. Make sure to keep it away from all external sources of ethylene, such as fruit, carbon monoxide and decaying plant material.
  3. Gypsophilia is primarily used as a filler flower to accent greens and fill voids between flowers. Using Gypsophilia in bouquets and arrangements creates more depth and dimension. Gypsophilia is very popular in Victorian style arrangements and wedding flowers.

Here are some other helpful facts about Baby’s Breath:

BB 3 What do You Know about Baby’s Breath?

Names:  Baby’s Breath, Gypsophila, Gyp

Varieties:  Gypsophila

Colors:  White.  Pink is available, but uncommon

Scent:  A sweet, distinct smell that is only associated with this flower, giving it its name.

Freshness:  Yes, very sensitive

Vase Life:  5 to 7 days.

Availability:  Year Round

Costs:  Inexpensive

Meaning:  Baby’s Breath got its name from its smell.

Arranging TipBaby’s Breath is a very popular (and sometimes overused) filler flower.  Small clusters of blossoms also work well in wedding and corsage design.

Growing Tip:  Gypsophila comes from the Greek for “gypsum-loving” in reference to the plants favoring of high calcium soils.

Here are some varieties we have available:

BB Wedding 1 What do You Know about Baby’s Breath?BB Wedding What do You Know about Baby’s Breath?

-       White

-       Yellow

-       Blue

-       Green

-       Pink

-       Red with Dark Pink Cast

-       Orange

-       Assorted

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

What Do You Know Aster?

December 24th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Aster 101

Aster Title What Do You Know Aster?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are 3 important things to consider with Aster:

Aster 1 What Do You Know Aster?Aster 2 What Do You Know Aster?

  1. Aster thrives in areas with cool, moist summers. It produces blue, white, or pink flowers in the late summer or fall.
  2. Plant height ranges from 8 inches to 8 feet, depending on variety. Tall varieties make good back-of-the-border plants and are also attractive planted in naturalized meadows.
  3. Aster is susceptible to powdery mildew and rust diseases, so choose diseases-resistant varieties.

Here are some other important things with Aster:

Aster 3 What Do You Know Aster?Aster 4 What Do You Know Aster?

Names: Scientific names for species within the Aster genus include Aster Dumosus (Bushy Asther), Aster Patens (Late Purple Aster), Aster Vimineus (Small White Aster), and Aster Praealtus (Willow Aster).

 Varieties: There are nearly 600 species in Eurasia and North America

Colors: White, lavender, purple, and yellow.

Scent: Many Asters do indeed smell, but their scents range far and wide depending on the specific species.

Freshness: Your fresh Whole Blossoms Aster will need to be hydrated upon arrival

Vase Life: 7 to 10 days

Availability: Year-around

Cost: Inexpensive

Meaning: Their name means “star.”

Arranging Tip: When you receive asters or are preparing them in an arrangement, follow the instructions below to ensure you don’t injure the flower heads while putting them in a vase. These instructions will also help your flowers blossom bright over the next few days. 1) Carefully remove any protective paper or plastic that may be wrapped around your bouquet. 2) While the stems are under water, cut off 1 inch at an angle. Cutting the stems opens the flower’s pores so they have the ability to drink more water. The reason it is recommended to cut them under water is to eliminate any air bubbles that may occur, which prevent the flower from drinking. The angle makes it easier to absorb the water 3) next, fill your flower vase with water that is at room temperature. Mix in 1 packet of flower food with the water. You may have received flower food with the bouquet. If not, ask your local florist if they have some. 4) If any excess foliage on the stems will fall below the water level, strip it off. Excess foliage is known to muddy the water, as well as suck up much of it so the actual blossoms don’t have enough to drink. 5) Retain your cut asters from any direct sunlight, heat and drafts. And keep them in a room that has a cool temperature. 6) Re-cut stems, change water and add second packet of flower food on day 3 or when the water is turning yellow and cloudy. If the water is starting to change colors, this means that bacteria are growing in it, which will cause the flowers to wilt faster. 7) Keep your bouquet looking fresh longer by removing spent leaves and dead heads.

Growing Tip:  Apply a thin layer of compost each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Pinch young shoots back to encourage bushiness. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. Stake tall varieties to keep them upright. After the first killing frost, cut stems back to an inch or two above soil line. Divide plants every three to four years as new growth begins in the spring, lifting plants and dividing them into clumps containing three to five shoots.

Here are some varieties we have available:

Aster Wedding 1 What Do You Know Aster?Aster Wedding What Do You Know Aster?

-          White

-          Lavender

-          Purple

-          Solidago

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

What Do You Know About Amaranthus?

December 18th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Amaranthus 101

Ama Title What Do You Know About Amaranthus?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are 5 important things to consider with Amaranthus:

Ama 1 What Do You Know About Amaranthus?Ama 2 What Do You Know About Amaranthus?

  1. Many parts of the plants, including the leaves and seeds, are edible, and are frequently used as a source of food in India and South America—where it is the most important species of Amaranthus, known as kiwicha.
  2. The red color of the inflorescences is due to a high content of betacynins, which is similar to the Hopi red dye amaranth.
  3. Ornamental garden varieties sold under the latter name is either Amaranthus cruentus or a hybrid between A. cruentus and A. powelli.
  4. In indigenous agriculture, A. cruentus is Central American counterpart to South American A. caudatus.
  5. The Aztecs used Amaranthus flowers in several of their ceremonies, making images of their gods (especially Huitzilopochtli) with Amaranth mixed with honey.

Here are some more details about Amaranthus:

Ama 3 What Do You Know About Amaranthus?Ama 4 160x300 What Do You Know About Amaranthus?

Names: Amaranthus is also called: Amaranth, Tampala, Tassel Flower, Flaming Fountain, Fountain Plant, Joseph’s Coat, Love-lies-bleeding, Molten Flower, Prince’s Feather and Summer Poinsettia.

Varieties: Amaranthus is a broad genus of about 60 species of short-lived herbs that mostly breed in tropical climates

Colors: Red, pink, purple

Scent: The flowers have no smell or odor worth the notice. At the most they smell like radish roots when crushed.

Freshness:  It is completely normal if your Amaranthus sheds, just make sure to keep them hydrated with fresh water continually.

Vase Life:  Between 5 to 10 days.

Availability: Year Around

Costs: Affordable

Meaning: Never fading flower

Arranging Tips: Making a hanging basket—using a hanging basket provides the opportunity to bring an arrangement into an area that may not be suited for a traditional tabletop piece. Trim all the zinnias and fill the basket so that the lower leaves rest at the rim. Trim and add the Amaranthus to the front and left side of the basket, allowing the blooms to hang over the rim. Trim and add the stems of lupine to the back right side of the basket so that the spires sit several inches above the zinnias. Finish by trimming the stems of veronica to a similar height and adding two stems to the center and two stems to the back left side.

Growing Tips: Amaranthus prefer partly shady to full sunlight conditions. The soil type is not overly important, though it should have a PH between 6 and 7; for most vibrant flowers it is best that the soil is not too rich, as this soil type encourages growth. They should be sowed indoors or outdoors when all the danger of frost has passed. Lightly cover the seed with soil, and make sure the seedling has plenty of light and protect from the cold. Spacing between seeds must be 10-14 inches apart. Germination is seen in 10-14 days at 70 degrees F.

Here are some varieties Amaranthus we have available:

Ama Wedding 1 What Do You Know About Amaranthus?Ama Wedding What Do You Know About Amaranthus?

-          Upright Red

-          Upright Green

-          Upright Bronze

-          Hanging Red

-          Hanging Green

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?

December 15th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Alstroemeria 101

Als What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are 5 important things to consider with Alstroemeria:

Als 1 What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?Als 2 What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?

  1. This particular variety grows from a cluster of tubers, sending up both, fertile and sterile stems. Some stems may reach up to 1.5 meters in height.
  2. The leaves of this variety are alternately arraganged and resupinate, twisted on the petioles so that the undersides are face up. The leaves can be in different shapes, while the blades have smooth edges.
  3. There are six curving stamens.  The stigma has three lobes. The fruit is a capsule with three valves. Alstroemeria are classified as an inferior monocot, meaning the petals are located above the ovary, and the leaves are parallel.
    1. If you look at an Alstroemeria stem you can sometimes see a spiral growth pattern on the stem. This is due to the production of new cells in a spiral sequence and this is the cause of the head moving the way it does.
    2. If the soil temperature rises too high (above about 22 degrees Celsius) the Alstroemeria plant puts its effort into producing more large tuberous roots at the expense of flowering shoots. With some varieties this can lead to production of exclusively blind non-flowering stems and no flowers.

Here are some other things to consider with Alstroemeria:

Als 3 What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?Als 4 What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?

Names: Alstroemeria, commonly called the Peruvian Lily or Lily of the Incas or Parrot Lily.

Varieties: The South American genus has about 50 species of flowering plants, mainly from mountainous regions in the Andes.

Colors:  They come in many shades of red, orange, purple, green, and white, flecked and striped and streaked with darker colors

Scent: No fragrance

Freshness: Alstroemeria stops producing flowers if they get too hot.

Vase Life:  About 2 weeks

Availability: Year-around

Costs: Low cost

Meaning: Friendship and devotion

Growing Tip: If you look at an Alstroemeria stem you can sometimes see a spiral growth pattern on the stem. This is due to the production of new cells in a spiral sequence and this is the cause of the head moving the way it does.

If the soil temperature rises too high (above about 22 degrees Celsius) the Alstroemeria plant puts its effort into producing more large tuberous roots at the expense of flowering shoots. With some varieties this can lead to production of exclusively blind non-flowering stems and no flowers.

Here are some varieties of Alstroemeria we have available:

Als Wedding 1 What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?Als Wedding What Do You Know About Alstroemeria?

-          White

-          White/Pink

-          Pale Green

-          Pink

-          Lavender

-          Purple

-          Yellow

-          Orange

-          Lily Salmon

-          Hot Pink

-          Red

-          Assorted

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Creating a Doorway Garland

December 11th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Ga Creating a Doorway Garland

Create a dramatic doorway with a garland bursting with spring flowers. Luscious greenery is entwined with Alstroemerias, wax flower, and baby’s breath for a decorative garland perfect for draping anywhere—from doors, arches, and windows to tables, candelabras and chairs.

To create these beautiful pieces you will need the following: Alstroemerias, wax flower, foliage, Plumosa, baby’s breath, paddle wire, and petite water tubes.

  1. Remove all thorns – If the stems of the Plumosa are thorny, use a hand towel to safely strip the thorns off.
  2. Begin Garland – Start by crisscrossing two stems of Plumosa and wrapping paddle wire around the center to secure the stems together. This will create one end of the garland.
  3. Continue Adding Stems – Begin to form the garland by adding more stems of Plumosa.
  4. Layer Stems – Layer each stem of stems (depending on desired fullness) one after the other.
  5. Wrap Stems with Wire – To secure the stems of Plumosa, hold the garland with one hand and wrap the paddle wire around it with the other. The paddle wire should be wrapped over some branches, but others can be loose and free.
  6. Cut Stems – Any excess stems may be cut with clippers as you form the garland.
  7. Finish Plumosa – Continue adding Plumosa until the desired length is reached. Finish off the end of the garland by adding last Plumosa stem in a crisscross fashion. Make a slip knot with the paddle wire to secure it at the end of the garland.
  8. Add Baby’s Breath – Cut branches of baby’s breath and space them along the garland. Wrap the stems into the garland with paddle wire.
  9. Add Foliage – Cut stems of foliage and lay them underneath the entire length of the garland. Wrap paddle wire from one end to the other to secure the stems to the garland.
  10. Add Waxflower – Add stems of wax flower to the garland and wrap with paddle wire.
  11. Add Alstroemerias – Cut stems of Alstroemerias approximately 8” (21cm) long and insert into water filled tubes. Place the flowers in various directions along the garland. Wrap paddle wire around the water tubes to secure the garland.
  12. Secure Flowers – Wrap the wire once more around the completed garland to secure everything. Wrap wire under individual flowers and foliage as needed. Cut the wire and bend the ends into the center of the garland.
  13. Store and Maintain – The garland can be made up to 48 hours in advance of the wedding. To prevent wilting, lightly mist the garland, and then coil it inside a dark plastic bag with a few air holes. Store it in a cool, dark place.

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

What Do You Know About Stock?

December 10th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Stock 101

Stock Title What Do You Know About Stock?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are 3 important things to consider with Stock:

Stock 1 What Do You Know About Stock?Stock 2 What Do You Know About Stock?

  1. Stock are sturdy spikes of dense clusters of sweetly scented single or double blossoms. Fresh stock have one-third to half of their blossoms open, with the remaining buds showing good color and size.
  2. Older stock have the bottom third of their flowers soft and wilted in appearance. Sometimes these blossoms have been stripped and only in the middle and tip are left. Check the blossom count to make sure you are getting a fresh product. Stock should be six or more blossoms high.
  3. Stock is useful as a base for arrangements, since the bottom part of the flower wilts first. Begin with a base of stock, adding other flowers in and around to hide the lower blossoms as the flower ages and leaving the middle part exposed. Stock also adds a lovely fragrance to any combination.

Here are some other things to consider with stock:

Stock 3 What Do You Know About Stock?Stock 4 What Do You Know About Stock?

Names: Stock, Matthilola, Gillyflower

Colors: Pastel shades of white, pink, apricot, and yellow are most common, but deep pink and purple are also available

Scent: Strong, spicy clove scent

Freshness: One-third to one-half of the bottom blossoms are open, with the remaining buds showing good size and color.

Vase Life: 3 to 5 days

Availability: All year, but spring and summer are the peak seasons.

Cost: Inexpensive

Meaning: Lasting beauty

Arranging Tip: Use this delightfully fragrant flower as a base for arrangements, so that the other flowers will hide the quickly spent bottom blossoms. The plump middle will make a nice addition for most combinations, their sturdy cushion appearance accenting other large flowers while acting as abrace for building the arrangement.

Other: Stock has very dense stems, which makes water penetration difficult and shortens the vase life of a flower. If the thick, white, fibrous base on the lower part of the stem remains, it must be cut away for proper conditioning. The fine fuzz that covers the stems contaminates the water and also shortens vase life. Change the water frequently and recut the ends.

Here are some varieties of stock we have available:

Stock Wedding 1 What Do You Know About Stock?Stock Wedding What Do You Know About Stock?

-          Cream White

-          Assorted

-          Lavender

-          Purple

-          Yellow

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

What Do You Know About Snapdragons?

December 8th, 2014 by Paul Walls

Snapdragons 101

Snap Title What Do You Know About Snapdragons?

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are 4 things to keep in mind with Snapdragons:

Snap 1 What Do You Know About Snapdragons?Snap 2 What Do You Know About Snapdragons?

  1. Snapdragons are tall, vertical spike flowers with graduating clusters of velvety blossoms along the top part of the stem. They range from about two or three feet in height. A fresh snapdragon has some of its blossoms open on the bottom, with several developing buds closed toward the middle to the top. These buds show good color, and the tips are usually green with tight buds. The flowers are almost upright.
  2. Older snapdragons have about two-thirds of their flowers open. Some of the bottom blossoms may be wilted or soft to the touch. The tip of the flower may start to droop. Snapdragons at this stage will last several days if recleaned and cut shorter. The flower will then revive and last for several more days.
  3. If you gently squeeze the side of the snapdragon blossom, you can see how this flower got its name. The blossoms resemble the mouth of a dragon, and the bottom lip will snap shut when released. This is actually how the flower protects its nectar. The pollinator must know how to open the blossom and get inside.
  4. You can cut the tips off to encourage the blossoms to open sooner, but the closed blossoms and green tips offer interesting color and texture in arrangements.

Here are some more facts about snapdragons:

Snap 3 What Do You Know About Snapdragons?Snap 4 What Do You Know About Snapdragons?

Names: Snapdragon, Antirrhinum

Colors:  Shades of white, pink, apricot, yellow, deep red, and burgundy. Some have contrasting colors at the mouth of the blossom.

Scent:  Slight to none

Freshness:  A few of the blossoms are open at the base of the flower spike, with the others in bud stage and showing good size and color. The flower is mostly upright.

Vase Life: 10 days to 2 weeks

Cost: Inexpensive

Meaning: Presumption

Arranging Tip:  Cutting the tips off will sometimes encourage more blossoms to open soon, however, the tips add interesting color and texture.

Growing Tip: A single snapdragon plant can be turned into several flowers by “fooling” the plant. When the snapdragon reaches two to four inches in height, pinch the stem back to the base of the plant. The plant will send up several new sprouts in response.

Here are some varieties of Snapdragons we have available:

Snap Wedding 1 What Do You Know About Snapdragons?Snap Wedding 2 What Do You Know About Snapdragons?

-          Assorted

-          Bi-Color

-          White

-          Pink

-          Lavender

-          Yellow

-          Orange

-          Burgundy

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