Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The Popular Trend of Having All-White Bouquets

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

White Bouquet 2 150x150 The Popular Trend of Having All White Bouquets

Many brides know the color of their bouquets before they even decide on a shape, style, size, or the flowers that will be included. They have always been the dream of all-white bridal bouquet, just bursting with silky white flower petals, round white rose heads, tiny dots of lily of the valley, and exotic stars of stephanotis. Just the thought of it takes their breath away.

If you’re locked on the idea of the all-white bridal bouquet, you might consider yourself a traditional bride, but you can also be a very modern bride, filling that all-white palette with some unexpected flowers—going beyond the classic bridal flowers of roses and gardenias.

Many brides say they started off with an all-white bouquet as a way to pay homage to mothers and grandmothers who also carried all-white bouquets on their wedding days, but then being a modern bride, they took that palette and elevated it to a new level with some quirky or creative style decisions.

It is not true that an all-white bouquet will automatically cost you more money. The price you pay depends on many factors: the types of flowers you select, whether or not they’re in-season or important, the design and style of your bouquet, and the size of your bouquet. True, you may need more white flowers to make a visual impact in any floral piece, but that doesn’t always add up to a bigger drain on your wallet.

Another aspect of the all-white bouquet is that it might allow you to use the white version of your birth-month flower, or the birth month flower of your wedding day, in order to convey a particular message from language of flowers through your budget.

All White Roses Bouquet

Rose White Wedding Boouquet 150x150 The Popular Trend of Having All White Bouquets

-          The all-white bouquet made only of roses is the number one bouquet style today

-          For the most uniform and traditional look, choose roses that are all the same size

-          Roses may be tightly packed with little else showing between each rose head placement, or they may be spread out within the round

-          Shades of white vary, with some flowers appearing crisp white and others looking more beige. Specify to your designer that all whites be monochromatic

All White Stephanotis Bouquet

Stephanotis White Bouquet 150x150 The Popular Trend of Having All White Bouquets

-          Stephanotis is a traditional bridal flower, imported and thus a bit more expensive than other traditional wedding blooms

-          The all-stephanotis bouquet tightly packed with dozens and dozens of tiny star-shaped flowers

-          If money is an object, you’re best off using stephanotis as an accent flower, perhaps as a textural accent to a rose bouquet

-          Stephanotis is known as a fragile flower. Oils from your fingers will brown the petals more quickly, so handle with care

All White Large and Small Flowers

White Bouqet 1 150x120 The Popular Trend of Having All White Bouquets

-          Mixing large and small flowers is a top way to build a more lush and impressive bouquet on a budget

-          The differences in flower sizes give the impression of more variety and greater number of flowers than are actually there

-          Include among your choices calla lilies, dendrobium orchids, roses, ranunculus, peonies, tulips, and then smaller “dot” flowers such as Bells of Ireland, lilies of the valley, and other tiny blooms

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

How to Preserve Your Floral Singles, Bunches, and Rounds Right before the Wedding

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Caring For Flowers 150x150 How to Preserve Your Floral Singles, Bunches, and Rounds Right before the Wedding

Now’s a good time to remind you that many floral varieties require a water source to keep them from wilting quickly if their stems are not sitting comfortably in water. Timing is everything with all aspects of weddings, so you want to be sure that the bouquets are stored in the perfect conditions before the wedding so that they’re fresh, quenched, and beautiful for the three to five hours of your celebration.

The detail of any flower’s or bouquet’s wellness could very well determine the style of bouquet you want and the types of flowers you will include in it. Perhaps you can easily supply a good water source for notoriously thirsty flowers, such as hydrangeas, which should be kept in water until the moment they’re attached into a bouquet and the stems given a small water capsule attachment as an all-day water source. Or maybe you’d rather not deal with water issues, so you’ll choose hardier flowers that can go on a few hours without water.

The heat on your wedding day is also a factor in the types of blooms you’ll choose, and how you’ll keep your singles, bunches, rounds, or other bouquets cool and comfortable until the moment they’re needed.

Make Sure To Keep Singles and Ribbon-Tied Bunches in Water

  • Before the wedding, as you dress and pose for photos, your single flowers and ribbon-tied bunches should be placed in vases with an inch of two of water.
  • A low-set amount of water will keep handle wraps from getting soaked.
  • Don’t shock flowers with ultra cold water. Make sure the vase water is just on the cool side.
  • No need to add flower food to vases that hold your wedding day bouquets. These powdery chemicals shouldn’t get on your hands.

Make Sure To Keep Bouquets, Boutonnieres, and Corsages in a Cooler

  • Take any measure to keep bouquets, boutonnieres, and corsages, cool and fresh during transportation to the ceremony site and during waiting time.
  • Use an oasis, which is a spongy water source used by florists, to keep the stems immersed in a portable water source during transport and waiting time.
  • Oversize thermal coolers are ideal for transporting and storing bouquets.

Make Sure To Keep Bouquets and Corsages in a Refrigerator

  • Arrange for your site manager to clear out a shelf in a walk-in-refrigerator for the pre-wedding storage of your bouquet and corsages.
  • Be sure that bouquets are well spaced on the refrigerator shelves so that they do not bump into and break each other.
  • Do not store your flowers in mini-size or travel refrigerator, as they simply are not large enough.
  • Bouquets fit better in a refrigerator when standing upright in individual, secure vases. This elevation protects a round.

Make Sure To Keep Centerpieces and Bouquets Set as Décor

  • Singles and bunches can double duty as table centerpieces, so set out vases to hold you and your bridesmaids’ bouquets on guest tables.
  • Preserve the round shape of a bunch by propping it up in a tall, wide-mouthed vase.
  • A grouping of three to five singles of bunches can serve as décor on the cake, gift, or guest book tables.
  • Singles, bunches, nosegays, and pomanders can be set on mantles and windowsills as (free) extra décor for the site.

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

4 Kinds of Branches That Will Help Your Floral Design

Sunday, September 28th, 2014

Flowering branches have taken over the architectural floral designs of many occasions. With more brides and grooms welcoming the natural look of “green” elements to their centerpieces, parties and engagements never looked more sophisticated. Adding height and drama in the form of unique floral trees that reach upward to the ceiling tent, and sky, couples with any style or formality of wedding bring a big dose of wow factor to their traditional centerpieces—or they make these architectural items the sole items in their centerpieces.

In most cases, these accents can be a bit more expensive. When there is a wealth of cherry and apple blossoms, you’ll pay a fraction of what the usual flower-filled centerpiece would cost. And outside of spring, you can have flowering and exotic branches imported at prices that are still friendly to the wallet. Your floral designer or an in-the-know gardener friend may have to force the blooms on these branches by following a series of steps, including putting the stems in hot water, cutting them repeatedly, and placing them in the cooler. But the efforts are worth it when you produce height, texture, and pretty florals for your architectural centerpieces.

1.       Flowering

  • Considering the flowering branches for your centerpieces: cherry, peach prune, quince, North Star cherry, forsythia, pear, apple, magnolia, and Malus or crab apple.
  • Crab apple trees of this variety produces pretty white flowers (snow-drift crabapple).

2.       Non-floral

  • Consider the following uniquely shaped branches: curly willow, birch, Manzanita, twig coral, natural coco bunch, and kiwi vines.
  • Also consider the following straight-line branches: natural reed, natural river cane, and bamboo.

3.       Berry

  • There’s a tremendous variety of berry-bearing branches, particularly when Hypericum berries provide rich orange, burgundy, and red tones.
  • In winter, holly berry branches bring a festive tone.
  • Bittersweet branches come in two varieties: one with red and orange berries for summer and another with a mix of red, orange, and brown berries for fall.
  • Some couples choose high-quality faux berries in their centerpieces to avoid toxic berries

4.       Other Unique Accents

  • The following décor are commonly used in architectural centerpieces: orange queen silk blossoms; lunaria, or silver dollar branches, also known as a money tree; royal blue pronus; and pampas grass plume.
  • Each branch of a money tree has quarter-to half-dollar-size circular white leaves, inspiring this tree’s name.
  • While most floral centerpiece stems extend twelve to thirty-six inches, the usual lengths range between thirty and forty inches.

Branches are an essential part of floral designs, incorporating them into your planning with fill everything with natural wonder and beauty. Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers offers a selection of branches that allows many decorative options. Please take a moment and consider the following options:

-          Pumpkin Tree

-          Cherry Blossoms

-          Cherry Blossoms

-          White Cherry Blossoms

-          Curly Willow Tips

-          Curly Willow Medium

-          Curly Willow Long

-          Manzanita Branches Firm

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

7 Helpful Hints When Choosing and Using Foliage

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

Greens are an important part to any floral arrangement, even more important than the flowers themselves. Foliage creates the shape of the arrangement, as well as balance. choosing foliage 7 Helpful Hints When Choosing and Using FoliageGreens also provide a dark background to highlight the bright colors of flowers. Greens are typically more affordable than flowers, so using them is not an added expense. There is a wide variety of interesting greens you can choose.

Before choosing, you may want to keep these 7 things in mind:

  1. You Want To Look For Foliage Varieties – Greens come in many shapes and patterns. Look for the right variety to complement your floral arrangement.
  2. You Want To Look For Leaf Shape And Textures – Not only is color important, but the shapes and textures as well. They are an important part of the creating of a beautiful arrangement.
  3. You Want To Look For Different Weights Of Leaves – You can create layered dimensions using heavy or light leaves.
  4. You Want To Select Leaves according To the Season– Some leaves are seasonal, so you want to plan according to the time of the year they are available.
  5. You Want To Arrange The Leaves The Way You Prefer Them – Heavier leaves should be towards the back of the vase, lighter leaves on top, or in front.
  6. You Want To Place The Leaves Firmly In The Arrangement – Push each stem firmly to ensure arrangement sits well. Make sure you have water in the container, removing any leaves below the water line, or they will begin to rot. Crush or split woody ends before placing them into the water.
  7. You Want To Condition The Leaves – To make the appearance of the leaves brighter, rub with olive oil. This will brighten up leaves and remove any stains.

Hopefully these are some helpful ideas to add to your wedding planning. At Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers, we would love to assist you and provide you with the freshest wholesale flowers available. We have FREE SHIPPING on every order and have very low prices.

What do You Know about Bells of Ireland?

Sunday, September 14th, 2014

Bells of Ireland 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are three things to know about Bells of Ireland:

  1. Bells of Ireland are tall, apple-green spike flowers consisting of several small white blossoms surrounded by green shell-type petals. The spikes are generally about 24 inches in length. Fresh bells of Ireland have the shell petals open and the small white flowers exposed. The spikes are straight and firm to the touch.
  2. The tips of bells of Ireland begin to droop with age. The shell-type petals at the base of the spike appear to be closed and may be discolored. The spike is soft to the touch.
  3. Bells of Ireland are most appreciated for the predominantly bright-green foliage surrounding the small white flowers, rather than for the flowers themselves. They can be used as a foliage choice as well. The color accents other flowers and brightens the overall bouquet.

Some facts to know about Bells of Ireland:

Names – Bells of Ireland, Moluccella, and shellflower.

Colors – Very small white flowers surrounded by predominant bright-green shells.

Scent – Very faint musk fragrance

Freshness – The shells are open and the white flowers exposed. The stems are upright.

Vase Life – 7 to 10 days or longer.

Availability – spring and summer

Cost – Inexpensive.

Arranging Tip – The bright-green color of bells of Ireland is a great accent in flower combinations. Use them like a foliage choice. Cut the tips off about one-third of the way down and set aside. Fill the vase with a base of the cut stems. Fill in with other flowers. Add the tips of the bells of Ireland around the edges of the other flowers and the container. The color really brightens the bouquet.

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

What do You Know about Calla Lilies?

Sunday, September 14th, 2014

Calla Lilies 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are four basic things to remember about calla lilies:

  1. Calla lilies are exquisite flowers with long trumpet-shaped blossoms and thick fibrous stems. A fresh calla is mostly open, but with the outer petal still reaching upward. The middle of the flower is clean, with no sign pollination. The flower shows good color with no bruising.
  2. Older callas have the outer petal curving downward, with the middle of the flower exposed. The middle shows signs of pollen. The flowers may also have bruising or discoloration, especially on the outer edges of the petal.
  3. Callas have thick, fibrous stems that act much like a sponge. The stems absorb and hold water. This is why callas have such a very long vase life. They are a very low-maintenance flower, but be sure to recut the stems every few days to allow fresh water to penetrate to the blossom. Calla stems sometimes turn to mush because the stems hold the water and the ends become clogged. They need a constant water flow to remain fresh.
  4. Flames colored calla lilies in a vase are elegant in their simplicity.

Here are some facts about calla lilies:

Names Calla lily, Arum Lily, Zantedeschia.

Varieties – The most common is the tall white variety, two to three feet in length.

Colors – White, shades of yellow, pink to deep rose, orange to Chinese red, salmon, burgundy, black. There is also a green variety called “green goddess.”

Scent – None

Freshness– The flowers are open, but the outer petal (or spathe) still turns upward. The middle is clean and shows no pollination. Watch for bruising.

Vase Life – 10 days or more. Callas are designed to hold water.

Availability – All year, but late winter to late spring is the peak season.

Cost – Expensive

Meaning – Calla lilies symbolize magnificent beauty

Note – The white calla has long been a symbol of purity, and is widely used in weddings as well as funerals.

Arranging Tip – The calla lily is the epitome of elegance. These flowers can add drama to any combination, but have just as strong a presence used alone.

Other – Check the water level frequently, since calla lilies are heavy drinkers.

Here are some popular varieties you may be interested in:

 

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

What do You Know about Bouvardia?

Sunday, September 14th, 2014

Bouvardia 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are three things to understand about Bouvardia:

  1. Bouvardias are clusters of small tubular flowers with four equal petals atop slender woody stems. A fresh Bouvardia should be mostly in bud stage, with only one to two flowers open. The buds should show good color.
  2. Older Bouvardia has most of their flowers open; some may have started to bend or drop from the cluster. Bouvardias bruise very easily when handled.
  3. Bouvardias are prone to premature wilting because water has difficulty penetrating the dense woody stems to reach the branching flower clusters. To prolong vase life, recut the stems and place into deep, fresh water frequently. This will help keep a steady water flow to the flowers. Also, tear off any excess greenery and blossoms so that more water reaches the primary blossoms.

Here are some facts about Bouvardia:

Names – Bouvardia

Varieties – Bouvardia hybrids in single and double varieties.

Colors – Whites, pinks, peaches, red, and a new green shade.

Scent – Very faint to none

Freshness – The buds show color, and only a couple of blossoms are open. The flowers bruise very easily.

Vase Life – Approximately 5 days. Bouvardia is very water sensitive. There is a special floral food available at most florists for Bouvardia, which aids in water absorption.

Availability – All year, but summer and fall are the predominant seasons.

Cost – Moderately priced

Arranging Tip – Bouvardia is popular choice for a wedding bouquet flower, but remember that they do not hold up out of water.

Here are some popular varieties of Bouvardia:

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to assist you by offering the freshest cut of wholesale flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING on every order of our flowers at incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

What do You Know about Chrysanthemums?

Saturday, September 13th, 2014

Chrysanthemums 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are five things to keep in mind with chrysanthemums:

  1. Chrysanthemums come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes. They are separated into 13 categories, depending on the blossoms type or shape of petals. Chrysanthemums can be single blossoms or sprays with several flowers. The blossoms range from daisy to cushion or button types. They can be single or have double layers of petals. The petals can curve inward, called incurve, or be reflexed, curving out.
  2. A popular type of chrysanthemum, especially in autumn to wear to football games, is the very large round blossom type with incurve petals. This variety has been nicknamed football mums.
  3. Chrysanthemums are a very long-lasting flower. It is best to purchase or cut them when the flowers are fully open. Cut too early in bud stage, they will not open. The daisy types will have the middle exposed. Other types, such as button or cushion blossoms, will be open, but the middle will appear to open further. Fresh chrysanthemums show good color and are firm to the touch.
  4. Older chrysanthemums have petals faded into color. The petals may become more separated with age, and the flower may feel almost soft to the touch. It may shed some of its petals when handled.
  5. The common daisy belongs to the chrysanthemum family.

Here are some facts about chrysanthemums:

Names – Chrysanthemum, Mum.

Varieties – About 1,000 different varieties.

Colors – Available in most shades but no true blue. Some are two-toned and multicolored.

Scent – A strong musk scent.

Freshness – Purchase or cut when the flowers are three-fourths to fully open. Flowers in bud will usually not open after being cut.

Vase Life – 10 days to two weeks or longer.

Availability – All year, but the prime season is summer.

Cost – Inexpensive

Meaning – The name chrysanthemum means “golden flower” in Greek. Individual colors have their own meanings: Red symbolizes love, white symbolizes truth, and yellow symbolizes slighted love. Snubbed in some countries as a funeral flower, the chrysanthemum is the national symbol of Japan, where it signifies long life and happiness.

Arranging Tip – Chrysanthemums are a very long-lasting cut flower and popular for arrangements. But they can shorten the vase life of other flowers and are best used alone.

Other – Chrysanthemums have thick, coarse stems which one would normally hammer or split. However, these flowers should be cut at a diagonal instead, owing to the large amounts of gas they give off. Change the water frequently to avoid an overabundance of harmful bacteria. A few pieces of horticultural charcoal in the water will help absorb some of the bacteria between water changes.

Here are some popular varieties you may be interested in:

Button Poms

CDN (Cushion, Daisy, Novelty) Pom

Cushion Poms

Daisy Poms

If you are planning a wedding or social event, we at Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to provide you with the freshest flowers available. We offer FREE SHIPPING and incredibly low prices. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com.

 

 

 

4 Ideas in Making Single-Stem Bouquets for Your Wedding

Friday, September 12th, 2014

A quick, simple, and inexpensive DIY project for you or your bridesmaids’ florals is to create single-stem flowers to use in place of bouquets, or fashioning a simple ribbon wrap to cluster informal bunches of flowers for a more casual wedding.

Single-stem and bunch bouquets, by virtue of being easy to create, are also great budget-friendly choices, as there is very little labor involved. The ultra detailed Biedermeier bouquet, which can take hours and hundreds of tiny flowers to affix in painstaking concentric circles, using both glue and pins. With this style of bouquet, you have just three easy steps.

Your bouquet choice always coordinates with the formality of your wedding and the design of your dress, so these styles offer the simplest class of effort for both formal and informal weddings. For instance, a single-stemmed calla lily works for a formal wedding, while a single-stemmed Gerber daisy suits an informal wedding. Your choice of ribbon must also work with the style and formality of your day, so look at lovely satin ribbon, some containing tiny pearl edges, for your more formal event, lace ribbon for your romantic Victorian garden wedding, or bright satin ribbon to match the color of daisy for your casual backyard wedding. In the informal realm, brides are choosing striped ribbon, plaids, and even ribbons with funky circles or color blocks to add a punch of creativity to their self-made designs.

The type of ribbon you use to create your single-stem or bunch bows and ties can also be used as coordinating décor for other parts of your wedding day, such as fabric placeholder in your guest book or the ribbon you use in your DIY favors, and even the ribbon you use in your flower girls’ hair.

  1. Using Single-Stem Roses
  • Choose a rose with a head that’s about to bloom for best appearance on your wedding day.
  • Choose a rose with a straight stem, strip it of leaves and thorns, and cut the stem to a length of 12 to 14 inches.
  • Ribbons wrap either the entire stem or simply tie a bow. Store your ribbon-bow-only single-stem flowers in a vase of water until it’s time to walk down the aisle.
  1. Using Single-Stem Callas
  • Gather the stems, perhaps moving the green leaves to the top of the collection, nearest the blooms.
  • Wrap the stem and leaves in place with floral tape all the way down the stem.
  • Wrap the entire stem with satin ribbon to give the flower enough sturdiness, or skip the tape and ribbon wrap and just tie a satin bow around the top third of the stem for decoration
  1. Using Single-Stem Daisies
  • Carefully remove the plastic brace set just below the flower’s head for support during shipping just before it’s time to walk down the aisle, but leave it on as you wrap the stem.
  • Daisy stems should be wrapped tightly with floral tape to give it extra strength, then covered with a ribbon wrap and tied with a ribbon bow.
  • If you cut the stems to a six-to eight-inch length, you can wrap them with lace instead of ribbon.
  1. Using Bunches
  • Gather your chosen wild-flowers, tulips, peonies, daisies, or other flowers and begin assembling your chosen arrangement of blooms.
  • Begin with larger flowers in the center; then build in circles around the outside.
  • Wrap the entire collection of stems with floral tape, cut across the bottom for a uniform cut level, and then wrap the entire stem collection with ribbon or lace in spiral fashion, going once down and then up to tie in a bow at the top.

Hopefully these are some helpful ideas to add to your wedding planning. At Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers, we would love to assist you and provide you with the freshest wholesale flowers available. We have FREE SHIPPING on every order and have very low prices. Come visit us at www.wholeblossoms.com.

What do You Know about Allium?

Friday, September 12th, 2014

Allium 101

Are you searching for the perfect flower and getting ready for your next planned event or wedding? Sometimes there is no right or wrong flower but a matter preference as to what fits your needs or what fits your personality. The 101 series is a series of articles helping to educate everyone with the contrasts of various flowers. You may want to read the others in this series as well as many other helpful articles.

There are four basic things to remember about allium:

  1. Alliums are clusters of small, star-shaped blossoms. The blossoms can be compact, forming a round, globelike cluster such as seen in the popular giganteum variety. This variety can reach four to six feet in height. Alliums can also be small, loose sprays of blossoms.
  2. A fresh allium should have one-third to one-half its blossoms open.
  3. Older allium flowers have most of their blossoms open, with some dried out. The onion odor may be more noticeable.
  4. The small white spray known as Allium neopolitanum is the only variety with a sweet, pleasant scent. This variety makes an excellent cut flower for arrangements.

Here are some additional facts about allium:

Names Allium, ornamental onion flower

Varieties – There are over 400 varieties of alliums. Alliums are composed of many star-shaped blossoms, which may be compact to form a round cluster, or loose sprays of blossoms.

Colors – Most alliums come in shades of purple, but some varieties are available in white, pink, or yellow.

Scent – Slight onion scent, becoming noticeable when the flowers are bruised, damaged, or aging.

Freshness – Alliums should have one-third to one-half of their blossoms open.

Vase Life – 10 days up to 3 weeks. Change the water frequently to prevent odor from developing.

Availability – Late spring through summer.

Cost – The giganteum variety—expensive. Other varieties—inexpensive to moderately priced.

Meaning – European folklore ascribed magical properties to the ornamental onion. The plant was used for good luck and protection against demons.

Arranging Tip – Be careful not to bruise the flowers when arranging, as this will release the onion odor.

Growing Tip – Alliums are very easy to grow, multiplying rapidly. They do well in poor or dry soil, and in full sun or shade. The flowers can last up to a month in the garden. Plant the tall, big-blossomed varieties in an area protected from wind, since the stems break easily.

Here are some specific varieties you may be interested in:

If you are looking for more information, or are looking for flowers for your next wedding and planned event, the people of Whole Blossoms Wholesale Flowers would love to help you. We have a large variety of flowers at wholesale prices, plus so much more. Please visit our website at www.wholeblossoms.com